⛵ Venice: travel in two days-second day

Venice in two days – Second day

On the second day we took a boat Vaporetto in San Marcos square. Previously we acquired a full day ticket that includes all the routes throughout the day. Our destination is the islands of Murano and Burano

To Search Hotels, Fligts, Rent a Car, City Tours & Cruises Click Here

Venice in two days    Venice in two days

During the trip to the island of Murano, (famous for its glass sculptures) you can enjoy the views of Piazza San Marco, Palazzo Ducaly and the Lido of Venice.

Murano Venice in two days  Venice in two days 

We arrived in Murano and noticed that in architecture, it is very similar to Venice, but smaller. It also has bridges and channels and the same charm.  We walk through the streets enjoying the shops that sell all kinds of objects and sculptures of glass and crystal.

Chiesa dei Santi Maria e Donato Chiesa dei Santi Maria e Donato 

You can also visit the Glass Museum and the churches of: Chiesa dei Santi Maria e Donato and the Chiesa di san Pietro martire ( see map & Pics)

  

Back at night, we could enjoy the same views in the morning but with the special charm of the night lighting of Venice. For the end of the day, we had dinner in one of the restaurants of the Piazza San Marcos.

Venice in two days 

See the  pot ☼ Venice in two days -first day

 

To Search Hotels, Fligts, Rent a Car, City Tours & Cruises Click Here

Transportation 

In the historic centre

 Venice is built on an archipelago of 112 islands formed by 179 canals in a shallow lagoon, connected by 419 bridges. In the old centre, the canals serve the function of roads, and almost every form of transport is on water or on foot.

Gondola

The classical Venetian boat is the gondola, (plural: gondole) although it is now mostly used for tourists, or for weddings, funerals, or other ceremonies, or as ‘traghetti’ (sing.: traghetto) to cross the Canale Grande in the absence of a nearby bridge. The traghetti are operated by two oarsmen; for some years there were seven such boats. The routes ( “stazi”)  are seven: 

 

  • San Marcuola – Fóndaco dei Turchi (near the Museo di Storia Naturale) [Mon–Sat 9am–12:30pm; to 1pm in winter]
  • Santa Sofia – Rialto Pescaria (Rialto Market) [Mon-Sat 7:30am–8pm; Sun 8:45am–7pm]
  • San Tomà – Sant’ Angelo [Mon–Sat 7:30am–8pm; Sun 8:30am–7:30pm]
  • San Barnaba – San Samuele [Mon–Sat 8:30am–1:30pm]
  • Santa Maria del Giglio – Salute [Daily 9am–6pm]
  • Riva del Carbon – Riva del Vin [Mon–Sat 8am–1pm]
  • Dogana (San Marco -Calle Vallaresso) – Punta della Dogana [Daily 9am–2pm]

How much does the traghetto cost?

Fares went up tremedously in 2013 (to €2) and again in 2014 (to €4) after the city stopped subsidizing the service.

You now pay €4. : You hand your fare to the gondolier when boarding.

Most people ride standing up.

 

 

Public transport

Azienda del Consorzio Trasporti Veneziano (ACTV) is a public company responsible for public transportation in Venice.

 A map of the waterbus routes in Venezia

Lagoon area

The main public transportation means are motorised waterbuses (vaporetti) which ply regular routes along the Grand Canal and between the city’s islands. The only gondole still in common use by Venetians are the traghetti, foot passenger ferries crossing the Grand Canal at certain points without bridges. Other gondole target tourists on an hourly basis.

The Venice People Mover (managed by ASM) is a cable-operated public transit system connecting Tronchetto island with Piazzale Roma. Water taxis are also active. Venice in two days



Booking.com

 

 

 

Leave a Comment